Wednesday, March 19, 2008

Belle of Georgia Semi-Dwarf Peach Tree

Click here for care instructions for the Belle of Georgia Semi-Dwarf Peach Tree.

The Pohick's have planted an orchard. Well, it is currently a decidedly small orchard since it has only one tree. You have to start somewhere though.

When we lived in Oklahoma, we had a peach tree in the back yard which produced some very lovely fruit. The girls loved being able to pick a peach right off of the tree and eat it. Everyone enjoyed all of the fresh peach products that Molly prepared including peach pies, peach cobbler, peach preserves and old fashioned peaches and cream. Since we have moved so many times over the last couple of years, there never was a good occasion to plant any fruit trees. But since we are planning to stay in place for a few years at least, we decided that it would be great to have a peach tree again and planted one today. It will probably be a couple of years before the tree bears much fruit, but it will give us something to look forward to. The tree that we purchased is a Belle of Georgia Semi-Dwarf Peach Tree. Here are a few facts and characteristics of the Belle of Georgia Peach tree:
  • Wikipedia Article: Peach
  • Scientific Name: Prunus persica
  • Light: 6+ hours of direct sun
  • Self fertile - No other pollinator required
  • Spacing: 20'
  • Bloom Time: Spring
  • Water Usage: Semi-Moist
  • Growth Rate: Medium
  • Average Mature Size: 15-20' x 20'
  • Cold Hardiness: -10 to -20F
  • Hardiness Zones: 5-8
  • Pruning: Prune while dormant
  • Fertilization: Annually
  • The Belle of Georgia peach tree in Georgia history was named after Mrs. Belle Hall of Ft. Valley, Georgia, following the Civil War, after it was developed from a peach seedling of Chinese cling-peach seed origin. The legendary Belle of Georgia peach has also been called the Georgia Belle peach and is classified as a white pulp peach, pleasantly fragrant and of intense sweetness and spicy flavor. Very few other white peach cultivars compare with the well known superior characteristics of the Belle of Georgia peach tree. Large trees of Belle of Georgia are recommended to buy, plant, and grow—often bearing a few peaches the first year after planting. The freestone characteristic of the Belle of Georgia white peach makes it easy to eat freshly picked from any home orchard. You can buy Belle of Georgia peach trees from many internet nursery sites. Belle of Georgia is a reliable producer of large, aromatic fruit unsurpassed in sweetness. Pink-blushed freestones with deliciously pale and juicy flesh ripen in August. Resists disease.
Peach Tree Journal:
19 March 2008
- Tree planted today. Currently our tree is 7'10" tall and has some buds and a few pink flowers.
30 March 2008 - So far so good. 11 days after being planted, the tree looks like it has survived the trauma of being planted. All of the tree's branches are covered with small green leaves.
7 June 2008 - Our peach tree continues to thrive and is now 8.5 feet tall. See updated picture and additional information.
20 June 2008 - Japanese Beatles are eating my peach tree
7 June 2009 - Growing strong and lots of fruit

Check in periodically and we will provide an update on the tree.

Click here for care instructions for the Belle of Georgia Semi-Dwarf Peach Tree.

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9 comments:

Anonymous said...

Since Jake and Molly didnt say where they moved I will watch with interest the progress of their tree. I too, on the same day planted the same tree nearly identical in description. I purchased it at Lowes. I live in Holden Beach, North Carolina and am concerned about my sand yard. I mixed 50% fine pine mulch and equal parts of sand and quality potting soil for the surrounding nurture. I will eagerly await postings on the developement of Jakes orchard. Thanks for the nice article. Noel

Jake Pohick said...

Thanks for your comment Anonymous,

We are living in Northern Alabama. We also purchased our tree at Lowes. Our soil is mostly top soil and has a pretty high organic content. I am keeping my fingers crossed that it will be OK. Jake.

Anonymous said...

I live about 20 miles south of Nashville, TN and purchased a 5' Georgia Belle peach tree from Lowes 3 years ago. It's now 14' high and just loaded with fruit. I've been thinning out the fruit, which is in clusters of 5 or 6 and am looking forward to being able to eat ripe peaches this Summer. Does anyone know when they would ripen in my area?
Thanks.

Anonymous said...

I live near Pittsburgh, PA and bought one of these trees also at Lowes last year. It survived the winter and is growing. Has fruit on it also. Wondering how to treat for disease and pests.......any suggestions?

Jake Pohick said...

According to the Clemson Home and Garden Information Center: Diseases & Insects

It is very difficult to grow-top quality peaches in the home orchard unless a rigid pest control program is maintained. A spray program should begin with dormant sprays and be carried through the growing season. The most damaging peach disease is a fruit rot commonly called brown rot. Other diseases of peaches include scab, Rhizopus rot, leaf curl, bacterial spot, peach phony, oak root rot and nematodes.

There are a number of insects that cause damage to peach flowers, fruit, limbs, twigs, and trunks. Among the most destructive in home garden peach plantings include peach tree borers, plum curculio, scale, catfacing insects (stink bugs and tarnished plant bugs), oriental fruit moths, Japanese beetles and the green June beetle. A spray program is essential in controlling insects and disease if you plan to be a successful peach grower.

Anonymous said...

Hi, I am Juan Garcia and I just planted 3 bella of georgia semi Dwarf peach that I bought in Lowes at a very good price, $20.00 each one. Also I bought other 3 apples trees. I founded you web and started to read about this tree, the peach one. I think I have done a mistake, since my backyard is only 30'x20' and I have 6 trees! am I right? Well, I guess that probably one or two of them will not survive next winter, I hope not all of them!. Also, I am afraid my two neighbors may get upset in the coming years if these trees keep growing as you guys are describing. Anyway, I am very excited and my son, 2 and one half has had a great day with me and my wife planting these trees. By the way, I live in Pittsboro, NC. I would like to ask if anyone has a list of fertilizers, and pestizides for the peach tree that I can use. I have read some tips, but if anyone is so kind, could you post a full list? If I missed in the web, sorry, I am going to keep looking

Anonymous said...

I live in Northern VA. I purchased at Wal-Mart my Belle of Georgia Semi-Dwarf Peach Tree and planted it March 18,2009.The Tree has grown 5in.The buds look hard and tight and not blossoming yet.Also planted a apple tree same day and already it has blossom and lots leaves.I wonder will the peach bud this spring or what can put to the soil to help it bud.

herb'sherbs said...

Moved to upstste NY near Albany & planted 2 Belle of Ga & 1 Red Haven peach 4 yrs ago...each produced appx 50 peaches last yr & this yr Red Haven unloaded almost 3 bu...Belles ready to pick any minute, not as loaded as RH, but tasted one almost ripe peach with pink blush & FABULOUS flavor..all suffered from hail & water damage in wet cool Spring, so not beautiful (use only dormant spray), but New Baltimore Farmers' Market customers appreciate superior flavors..Herb's Herbs

Anonymous said...

Your blog keeps getting better and better! Your older articles are not as good as newer ones you have a lot more creativity and originality now keep it up!